Blog

07 Oct
0

NYC Land Deal With UN Would Close Waterfront Gap, Mayor Says

By Henry Goldman and Katie Spencer

New York City moved a step closer to completing an 18-year-old plan for a waterfront esplanade around Manhattan after the United Nations Development Corp. agreed to pay $73 million for land to build offices, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

The transaction would provide cash to fill a one-mile gap between East 38th and 60th Streets, allowing runners, bicyclists and walkers to use a waterside pathway from the Hudson River in Washington Heights south to the Battery, and then north along the East River past Wall Street to 125th Street. Currently cyclists and pedestrians have to leave the path and use First Avenue and other streets on that midtown stretch.

Under the memorandum of understanding, reached after months of negotiation, the United Nations Development Corp., a public- benefit corporation separate from the UN, would pay $73 million to a specially created entity, the Eastside Greenway and Park Fund. It would receive part of Robert Moses Playground, just south of UN headquarters, where the world body has sought land to build an office tower.

Full Article

Read More
07 Oct
0

Statement from Liz, Assemblyman Brian Kavanagh & Councilmember Dan Garodnick on Signing of MOU

Statement of Senator Liz Krueger, Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh and Council Member Dan Garodnick on the Signing of the Memorandum of Understanding to Create an East River Greenway

As representatives on the East Side of Manhattan in the State Legislature and the City Council, we are pleased to announce that we have signed an agreement with the City of New York, the Speaker of the Assembly and the Senate Majority Leader that has the potential to transform our community’s waterfront and parkland.

Full Statement

Read More
02 Oct
0

NYT Editorial: An Esplanade on the East River

Published: October 2, 2011

There is now a potential solution to both problems. The plan, strongly promoted by Mayor Michael Bloomberg, would involve an agreement to provide land for a new United Nations tower and generate money for the city to build an esplanade from 38th to 60th streets.

Under the proposal, the city would allow the tower to be built on a portion of a playground on 42nd Street just south of the United Nations campus. In exchange, the city would get at least $65 million. This move would also allow the city to sell two buildings nearby that it currently leases to the United Nations. Sales of those properties could raise up to $200 million to pay for the new esplanade and other city projects, including a new playground at 23rd Street.

There is a hitch, of course. The transfer of the playground land, authorized by state lawmakers, requires state and local politicians to sign a memorandum of understanding with the city by Oct. 10. If they cannot agree, the United Nations could build on its own campus, where it is exempt from city land use laws. The city would also lose financing for its new projects.

In recent weeks, some opponents have stepped up their criticism of the project. Many in the neighborhood are worried that a new building would block their view of the East River. Those objections and political maneuvers should not be allowed to stand in the way of adding much-needed public space along the river.

Full Editorial

Read More
27 Sep
0

Liz’s Free Events List for October 2011

Click Here for Senator Liz Krueger’s Free Events List in Senate District 26 for October 2011.

Read More
21 Sep
0

Residents Make Last Stand at Final Public Forum on East River Greenway

KIPS BAY — The final public forum to debate the proposed East River Greenway project drew a hefty crowd of more than 300 people on Tuesday night with residents still divided over the best fate for the project.

Most of those present testified in favor of the deal, which could bring to life a project that has been decades in the making: filling in the gaping hole in the East River esplanade from East 38th to 60th streets.

The UN tower would be built as part of a complicated land swap in which the international organization would purchase the western portion of Robert Moses Playground from the city for their new building. It could then move employees from two city-owned buildings across the street, freeing up the city to sell those structures and use part of the proceeds from the sale to fund the East River greenway.

Full Article

Read More
21 Sep
0

Liz’s Testimony Before State’s Hearing on Redistricting

Testimony of State Senator Liz Krueger before the Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment (LATFOR) regarding Congressional and Legislative Redistricting.

Read More
19 Sep
0

Concerned About the State’s Redistricting Process? Ensure Your Voice Is Heard

The State’s Task Force charged with developing a redistricting plan for the State’s Congressional, Senate and Assembly district lines will be holding a hearing in Manhattan this Wednesday, the 21st.  Senator Liz Krueger encourages you to attend this meeting and submit a comment.  We must all be involved and vocal to ensure our democratic process is not tainted by politically-driven gerrymandering.

Click HERE for information on this week’s hearing and how to submit testimony.

Read More
14 Sep
0

Ball, Krueger Joust Over Need for Speed on Health Exchange

Sens. Greg Ball and Liz Krueger debated the state’s creation of a health benefit exchange, one of the major items left dangling at the end of the 2011 legislative session, on Susan Arbetter’s “Capitol Pressroom” on Wednesday morning. Depending on who you talk to, the exchange — required by the federal Health Care Reform Act — is either the camel’s nose under the tent of Obamacare or an absolutely necessary resource to reduce the cost of health insurance for small businesses.

As reported by the TU’s Cathleen Crowley last week, New York secured the first phase of federal funding that will aid in the creation of the exchanges, although resistance from Ball and other Senate GOP members scotched a deal reached among the Assembly, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and moderate Republican senators such as James Seward and Kemp Hannon…

…Krueger disagreed, and said that the health exchanges have nothing to do with the state’s Medicaid benefit. “We’re cutting off our nose to spite our face,” she said, arguing that time was indeed of the essence if New York wanted to glean as much federal funding as possible.

“This is going to take us time — you do not change your system of health insurance and access to health care on the drop of a dime,” she said. “The states that start earlier are going to reap the rewards of broader, more cost-effective health insurance and health care sooner.”

Full Article

Read More
14 Sep
0

Liz Discusses the Need to Act on Healthcare Exchange Bill Currently Being Held Up By Senate Republicans

Click here to listen to Senator Liz Krueger’s interview with Susan Arbetter on The Capital Pressroom.

Read More
07 Sep
0

Liz’s Community Bulletin: September 2011

Message from Liz . . .

We are a less than a week away from the 10 year anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001, and just over a week past Hurricane Irene.   Each had a very different and complex cause; both left us with the immediate need to rebuild our communities.  Both also highlight the importance of interdependence as a fundamental strength of our democratic society.  In other words, none of us “do it all by ourselves;” we survive through our inter-relationships and our dependence on institutions. When the basic safety and infrastructure of local communities is damaged, we must rely on others to help us rebuild. It really does “take a village.”

It is during these times that we, as a society, are tested.  The attack on 9/11 took thousands of lives and its impact was felt throughout the world. Here in NYC our fortitude, our ability to overcome fear and our challenge to work together to rebuild our City were tested.  Hurricane Irene caused enormous destruction to communities up and down the East Coast, fortunately with minimal loss of life, and it tested our societal ability — government and private citizens alike — to plan for and respond to emergencies.  In each case we passed these tests with flying colors.

Out of these tragedies we have seen something amazing: people – as professionals, as volunteers and as neighbors – rushing to help each other.  But without the organization and direction of government and nonprofit institutions, this response would have been haphazard and wasteful.  Imagine the rescue and recovery at Ground Zero without the FDNY, the NYPD and EMS. Absent prior planning, clear command and control, appropriate use of trained experts, monetary resources directed properly and coordination of effort, disaster response does not work.  Neighbors helping neighbors is a wonderful thing, but it is only governmental entities that can ensure maximum efficiency and effectiveness at such a large scale. (Speaking of helping out — due to the disruptions caused by Irene, all our blood banks could really use donors right now.  More info is below)….

Complete Community Bulletin: Sept 2011

Read More
Sign up for LizList